ポール・グレアム「ベンチャーの実態」を翻訳しました。
原題はWhat Startups Are Really Likeで、原文はhttp://www.paulgraham.com/really.htmlです。
英語に強い皆様、コメント欄にアドバイスをよろしくお願いいたします。


ベンチャーの実態
What Startups Are Really Like

2009年10月
October 2009

(このエッセイは2009年の起業スクールでの話を元にしています)
(This essay is derived from a talk at the 2009 Startup School.)

起業スクールで何を話せばいいのかよくわからなかったので、私たちが出資した起業家たちに尋ねることにした。私がまだ書いてないことって何?
I wasn't sure what to talk about at Startup School, so I decided to ask the founders of the startups we'd funded. What hadn't I written about yet?

私は、ベンチャーに関して書いた自分のエッセイをテストできるという珍しい立場にいる。他の話題についても正しくあってほしいのだが、私にはそれらをテストする方法がまったくない。ベンチャーのエッセイは、6カ月ごとに、約70人によってテストされる。
I'm in the unusual position of being able to test the essays I write about startups. I hope the ones on other topics are right, but I have no way to test them. The ones on startups get tested by about 70 people every 6 months.

そこで私は「ベンチャーを立ち上げて何に驚きましたか?」と尋ねるメールを、すべての起業家に送った。私が十分に説明したことには驚かないだろうから、この質問は私の間違いを尋ねることになる。
So I sent all the founders an email asking what surprised them about starting a startup. This amounts to asking what I got wrong, because if I'd explained things well enough, nothing should have surprised them.

私は、こんな返信を受け取ったのを誇りに思う。
I'm proud to report I got one response saying:

いちばんの驚きは、すべてが実際にはかなり予測可能だったということです!

What surprised me the most is that everything was actually fairly predictable!



悪いニュースは、起業家たちが出会った衝撃を書き連ねた回答を100通以上、受け取ったということだ。
The bad news is that I got over 100 other responses listing the surprises they encountered.

返事には、たいへんはっきりとしたパターンがあった。複数の人が、しばしばまったく同じものにたいへん驚いていたのが目立った。最大級のものを以下に示そう。
There were very clear patterns in the responses; it was remarkable how often several people had been surprised by exactly the same thing. These were the biggest:


1. 共同設立者に注意せよ
1. Be Careful with Cofounders

これは、最も多くの起業家が述べた衝撃だった。回答は2通り。「共同設立者を選ぶのは慎重にすべし」と「関係の維持に四苦八苦」だ。
This was the surprise mentioned by the most founders. There were two types of responses: that you have to be careful who you pick as a cofounder, and that you have to work hard to maintain your relationship.

「共同設立者を選ぶとき、もっと注意してればなあ」とみんなが後悔したのは、能力ではなく、性格と熱心さだった。失敗したベンチャーでは特にそうだった。教訓。うわべだけの共同設立者を選ぶな。
What people wished they'd paid more attention to when choosing cofounders was character and commitment, not ability. This was particularly true with startups that failed. The lesson: don't pick cofounders who will flake.

典型的な返信はこんな風だった。
Here's a typical reponse:

いっしょにベンチャーを立ち上げて、はじめてその人の本性がわかります。

You haven't seen someone's true colors unless you've worked with them on a startup.



性格がとても重要なのは、他のほとんどの状況よりも厳しいテストだからだ。ある起業家は、能力よりも起業家との関係のほうが重要だと言い切った。
The reason character is so important is that it's tested more severely than in most other situations. One founder said explicitly that the relationship between founders was more important than ability:

ベンチャーを共同設立するなら、能力の高い人よりも友達としたいです。ベンチャーはすごく難しく、感情を揺さぶるものなので、友情についてくる絆と友情と社会的な支援は、才能不足を補って余りあります。

I would rather cofound a startup with a friend than a stranger with higher output. Startups are so hard and emotional that the bonds and emotional and social support that come with friendship outweigh the extra output lost.



私たちはとっくの昔にこの教訓を学んでいた。YCに応募したら、起業家の能力よりも、熱意と人間関係についての質問が多いとわかるだろう。
We learned this lesson a long time ago. If you look at the YC application, there are more questions about the commitment and relationship of the founders than their ability.

成功した起業家は、共同設立者を選ぶ方法よりも、人間関係の維持の大変さについて語る。
Founders of successful startups talked less about choosing cofounders and more about how hard they worked to maintain their relationship.

驚いたことの一つは、ベンチャー起業家の関係は友情から結婚レベルにまで至る、ってことです。僕と共同設立者との関係は、ただの友人から、絶えずお互いを見つめ、お金からウンコの心配をするまでに至りました。そしてベンチャーは僕らの赤ちゃんでした。僕は昔、そのことを次のように要約したことがあります。「僕たち、結婚しているみたいに見えるけど、エッチはしてないんです」って。

One thing that surprised me is how the relationship of startup founders goes from a friendship to a marriage. My relationship with my cofounder went from just being friends to seeing each other all the time, fretting over the finances and cleaning up shit. And the startup was our baby. I summed it up once like this: "It's like we're married, but we're not fucking."



何人かが「結婚」という言葉を使った。それは普通の同僚同士よりもはるかに激しい関係だ。圧力がはるかに強いためでもあるし、起業直後は会社に起業家たちしかいないせいでもある。だからこの関係は、最高の素材で作り、慎重に維持する必要がある。すべてはそこからだ。
Several people used that word "married." It's a far more intense relationship than you usually see between coworkers—partly because the stresses are so much greater, and partly because at first the founders are the whole company. So this relationship has to be built of top quality materials and carefully maintained. It's the basis of everything.


2. ベンチャーが生活のすべてとなる
2. Startups Take Over Your Life

普通の同僚の間よりも共同設立者との関係のほうが濃いのと同様、起業家と企業の関係も濃い。ベンチャーの経営は終わりがないという点で、就職や学生とは別物だ。ほとんどの人はそんな経験がないため、はじめて体験すると非常な違和感を感じる。[1]
Just as the relationship between cofounders is more intense than it usually is between coworkers, so is the relationship between the founders and the company. Running a startup is not like having a job or being a student, because it never stops. This is so foreign to most people's experience that they don't get it till it happens. [1]

  僕は自分が、起きている時間のほとんどを、ベンチャーの仕事か、もしくはベンチャーのことを考えることに費やすことになると気づいていませんでした。自分の会社で働く生活は、他人の会社で働く生活とはまるっきり別ものですね。

I didn't realize I would spend almost every waking moment either working or thinking about our startup. You enter a whole different way of life when it's your company vs. working for someone else's company.



ベンチャーでの生活は、猛スピードで感情が揺さぶられ、時間が遅くなったように感じる。
It's exacerbated by the fast pace of startups, which makes it seem like time slows down:

僕がいちばん驚いたのは、時間に対する感覚がすごく変わったことです。自分のベンチャーに取り組むと、時間が長くなったように感じました。一ヶ月がものすごく長かったです。

I think the thing that's been most surprising to me is how one's perspective on time shifts. Working on our startup, I remember time seeming to stretch out, so that a month was a huge interval.



最高のケースでは、没頭が面白いこともある。
In the best case, total immersion can be exciting:

昼も夜も考え、驚くほどの時間を自分のベンチャーに費やすようになりますが、一度もそれを「仕事」と感じたことはありません。

It's surprising how much you become consumed by your startup, in that you think about it day and night, but never once does it feel like "work."



だがこの文章は、私たちが今年の夏に資金を提供した人からの文章だと白状しなければならない。数年後には、そんな威勢のいいことは言っていないかもしれない。
Though I have to say, that quote is from someone we funded this summer. In a couple years he may not sound so chipper.


3. 感情のジェットコースターだ
3. It's an Emotional Roller-coaster

これは多くの人々が驚いたものの1つだ。感情の浮き沈みは予期していたよりも激しかった。
This was another one lots of people were surprised about. The ups and downs were more extreme than they were prepared for.

ベンチャーでは、ある瞬間にすばらしいと思ったことが、次の瞬間には絶望となる。そして「次の瞬間」とは数時間後のことだ。
In a startup, things seem great one moment and hopeless the next. And by next, I mean a couple hours later.

僕がいちばん驚いたのは、感情の浮き沈みです。ある日は自分たちは次のGoogleだと思い「島を買おうかな」なんて夢想しますが、次の日には「自分たちは完全に失敗した」と、親戚に連絡する方法について考えてます・・・そんな毎日です。

The emotional ups and downs were the biggest surprise for me. One day, we'd think of ourselves as the next Google and dream of buying islands; the next, we'd be pondering how to let our loved ones know of our utter failure; and on and on.



もちろん困難なのは落ち込んだときだ。多くの起業家にとって、これは非常な驚きだった。
The hard part, obviously, is the lows. For a lot of founders that was the big surprise:

キツい日や週に、みんなにやる気を出させ続けるのがどれほど困難か、つまり、真の最低とは何かがわかります。

How hard it is to keep everyone motivated during rough days or weeks, i.e. how low the lows can be.



しばらくたってもやる気が出るような大成功がなければ、疲れてくる:
After a while, if you don't have significant success to cheer you up, it wears you out:

起業家への最も基本的なアドバイスは「文字通りの意味で死ぬな」ということです。企業を安泰に維持するエネルギーはタダではありません。起業家から吸いとっているのです。

Your most basic advice to founders is "just don't die," but the energy to keep a company going in lieu of unburdening success isn't free; it is siphoned from the founders themselves.



背負える重荷にも限度がある。これ以上、働くことができない地点に来てしまっても、この世の終わりってわけじゃない。多くの有名な起業家は、そういった轍を踏んでいる。
There's a limit to how much you can take. If you get to the point where you can't keep working anymore, it's not the end of the world. Plenty of famous founders have had some failures along the way.


4. 楽しみになりうる
4. It Can Be Fun

いいニュースは、喜びもまた非常に深いということだ。何人かの起業家は、ベンチャーを経営していちばん驚いたのは、それが非常に面白いことだったと述べた。
The good news is, the highs are also very high. Several founders said what surprised them most about doing a startup was how fun it was:

ベンチャーがどれほど面白いかってことを、みんな、見落としているのではないでしょうか。起業しなかった友人の誰よりも、僕の仕事は充実していました。

I think you've left out just how fun it is to do a startup. I am more fulfilled in my work than pretty much any of my friends who did not start companies.



彼らがもっとも好きなのは自由だ。
What they like most is the freedom:

昔してたプロの殺し屋のように思えた仕事とはぜんぜん違う、何かやりがいがあって創造的な仕事に挑戦していると、どれほど爽快か、驚いちゃいます。そういう仕事は気分がいいだろうなとは思っていましたが、こんなに良いなんて。

I'm surprised by how much better it feels to be working on something that is challenging and creative, something I believe in, as opposed to the hired-gun stuff I was doing before. I knew it would feel better; what's surprising is how much better.



だが率直に言って「ベンチャーは面白い」という点を誤解させていたとして、私はその間違いを正したくはない。みんなに「面白い」と思わせて起業させ、数ヵ月後に「これが面白いだって? 冗談だろ」と言われるくらいなら、「ベンチャーの起業は大変で難しい」と思わせたほうがマシだ。
Frankly, though, if I've misled people here, I'm not eager to fix that. I'd rather have everyone think starting a startup is grim and hard than have founders go into it expecting it to be fun, and a few months later saying "This is supposed to be fun? Are you kidding?"

実際は、ほとんどの人には面白くないだろう。私たちがソフトでしようとしていることの多くは、人々が望まないものを、私たちやみんなのために取り除くことだ。
The truth is, it wouldn't be fun for most people. A lot of what we try to do in the application process is to weed out the people who wouldn't like it, both for our sake and theirs.

ベンチャー起業の面白さについての最高の比喩は、サバイバル・トレーニングのコースはそれが趣味の人には面白いだろうというものだ。つまり、その趣味がない人はご愁傷様。
The best way to put it might be that starting a startup is fun the way a survivalist training course would be fun, if you're into that sort of thing. Which is to say, not at all, if you're not.


5. 粘り強さが鍵だ
5. Persistence Is the Key

多くの起業家は、ベンチャーに粘り強さがどれほど重要かを知って驚いた。否定的な驚きも、肯定的な驚きもあった。どれほど粘り強さが必要かということにも。
A lot of founders were surprised how important persistence was in startups. It was both a negative and a positive surprise: they were surprised both by the degree of persistence required

みんな、断固たる決意と立ち直りの早さがすごく重要だと言っていましたが、自分がひどい目に遭ったとき、粘り強さの必要性は、まだ控え目に言われていたと悟りました。

Everyone said how determined and resilient you must be, but going through it made me realize that the determination required was still understated.



そして、たんに粘り強いだけでも、どれほど障害を取り除けるかということにも。
and also by the degree to which persistence alone was able to dissolve obstacles:

粘り強ければ、制御不可能な問題(つまり入国審査)さえ解決できるようです。

If you are persistent, even problems that seem out of your control (i.e. immigration) seem to work themselves out.



数人の起業家は、粘り強さは知性よりずっと大切だと言い切った。
Several founders mentioned specifically how much more important persistence was than intelligence.

粘り強さが単なる知性よりもとても大事だということに、僕は何度も驚かされました。

I've been surprised again and again by just how much more important persistence is than raw intelligence.



これは知性だけではなく、一般に能力全般にあてはまる。そしてこれが、非常に多くの人々が「共同設立者を選ぶなら性格が大事だ」と述べた理由だ。
This applies not just to intelligence but to ability in general, and that's why so many people said character was more important in choosing cofounders.


6. 長い目で見ろ
6. Think Long-Term

万事、予想より時間がかかるから、根気が必要だ。多くの人はそこに驚いていた。
You need persistence because everything takes longer than you expect. A lot of people were surprised by that.

万事に時間がかかることに、いつも驚いています。自社の製品は、ごくわずかな製品がするような爆発的な成長なんてせず、開発から販売(特に販売)まで、すべてに自分の想像より2~3倍の時間がかかります。

I'm continually surprised by how long everything can take. Assuming your product doesn't experience the explosive growth that very few products do, everything from development to dealmaking (especially dealmaking) seems to take 2-3x longer than I always imagine.



起業家が驚く理由の1つは、自分たちはすばやく働いているので、周囲もすばやく働くと思ってしまうからだ。ベンチャーが大企業やベンチャー・キャピタルといった、より官僚的な組織と接触すると、いつも驚くほどブレーキがかかる。それが資金調達と企業市場によって、とても多くのベンチャーが倒産したりダメになってしまう理由だ。[2]
One reason founders are surprised is that because they work fast, they expect everyone else to. There's a shocking amount of shear stress at every point where a startup touches a more bureaucratic organization, like a big company or a VC fund. That's why fundraising and the enterprise market kill and maim so many startups. [2]

だが私は、ほとんどの起業家が時間がかかることに驚くのは、自信過剰だからだと思う。YouTubeやFacebookみたいに、すぐ成功すると思っているのだ。そんなルートをたどるベンチャーは、成功するベンチャーの1%だけだと言ったところで、彼らはみんな「僕たちはその1%だ」と考える。
But I think the reason most founders are surprised by how long it takes is that they're overconfident. They think they're going to be an instant success, like YouTube or Facebook. You tell them only 1 out of 100 successful startups has a trajectory like that, and they all think "we're going to be that 1."

たぶん彼らは、より成功した起業家の言葉なら聞くだろう。
Maybe they'll listen to one of the more successful founders:

ベンチャーではじめて知った最大のことは、根気の重要性です。成功するベンチャーの大半は、本当に時間が必要で、少なくとも3年、おそらくは5年以上、かかります。

The top thing I didn't understand before going into it is that persistence is the name of the game. For the vast majority of startups that become successful, it's going to be a really long journey, at least 3 years and probably 5+.



長い目で見ることには長所がある。「それくらいだろうと思った時間よりも長くかかると、あきらめてしまうから」というだけではない。粘り強く働けば、ストレスはそれほど大きくなく、良い仕事ができるからだ。
There is a positive side to thinking longer-term. It's not just that you have to resign yourself to everything taking longer than it should. If you work patiently it's less stressful, and you can do better work:

リラックスしてから、仕事を楽しむのはずっと簡単になりました。失敗しないように行動するという、絶対の要求に神経を使うのは大変でした。僕らは自社、製品、社員、顧客にとって最高のことをするのに専念できます。

Because we're relaxed, it's so much easier to have fun doing what we do. Gone is the awkward nervous energy fueled by the desperate need to not fail guiding our actions. We can concentrate on doing what's best for our company, product, employees and customers.



それが収益が「ラーメン代稼ぎ」に達すると、物事が好転する理由だ。違うモードで働くことができるんだ。
That's why things get so much better when you hit ramen profitability. You can shift into a different mode of working.


7. 雑用がいっぱい
7. Lots of Little Things

起業家たちが「夢のようなアイデア」なるものを思いつくので、私たちは「ベンチャーはめったに成功しない」と強調する。今では起業家たちは、そのことを理解したと思う。だが多くの人々は、次の教訓も多くのベンチャーに当てはまるので驚いた。いろんなことをする必要があるのだ。
We often emphasize how rarely startups win simply because they hit on some magic idea. I think founders have now gotten that into their heads. But a lot were surprised to find this also applies within startups. You have to do lots of different things:

魅力的というよりは骨の折れる仕事です。時間を分割してランダムに取り出したら、戦略的にすばらしいひらめきの洞察を得ている時よりも、むしろスウェーデン版のWindowsの奇妙なDLLローディングのバグを捜したり、役員会議の前夜に、金融モデルExcelのスプレッドシートのバグを追跡している時のほうが多いでしょう。

It's much more of a grind than glamorous. A timeslice selected at random would more likely find me tracking down a weird DLL loading bug on Swedish Windows, or tracking down a bug in the financial model Excel spreadsheet the night before a board meeting, rather than having brilliant flashes of strategic insight.



ハッカーの起業家のほとんどは、すべての時間をプログラミングに使いたがっている。失敗しない限り、そうはできない。これはこんな風に言い換えられる。すべての時間をプログラミングに費やすと、失敗する。
Most hacker-founders would like to spend all their time programming. You won't get to, unless you fail. Which can be transformed into: If you spend all your time programming, you will fail.

この原則はプログラミングにさえ拡張できる。成功を約束する、ある1つの才能あふれるハックなどめったにない:
The principle extends even into programming. There is rarely a single brilliant hack that ensures success:

機能、取引、その他なんであれ、成功を1つのものに賭けないことを、僕は学びました。決してただ1つのものではないのです。万事は単に増加させるだけで、成功するまでそれらの多くのことをし続ける必要があるのです。

I learnt never to bet on any one feature or deal or anything to bring you success. It is never a single thing. Everything is just incremental and you just have to keep doing lots of those things until you strike something.



賢いハックでひと財産を作るという、めったにない時でさえ、後になってはじめてそうだったと判明するだろう。
Even in the rare cases where a clever hack makes your fortune, you probably won't know till later:

キラー機能なんてありません。少なくとも何がキラー機能なのか、自分ではわかりません。

There is no such thing as a killer feature. Or at least you won't know what it is.



だから最高の戦略は、いろんなことをたくさん試すことだ。普通のかごではなく、最高のかごがどれかどれか分かっているときでさえ、「すべての卵を1つのかごに入れてはいけない」というのは正しい。ベンチャーでは、それさえわからない。
So the best strategy is to try lots of different things. The reason not to put all your eggs in one basket is not the usual one, which applies even when you know which basket is best. In a startup you don't even know that.
(「ベンチャーの実態」(中)に続く)