September 24, 2018

あの弾丸の行方い肇廛罐淆 and their amazing bricolage!

41099624_228616518012445_8352038238965202944_n
image: interview
<日本語はスクロールダウンしてください>

PN20180921-fn008

20180906

9:00 in the morning, I drove down to a 檳榔(betel nuts) shop before meeting the elders.
People suggested it when I asked what to bring.
I had wanted to meet them to ask about "January 1945" after reading the archaeological report by 2 Japanese archaeologists 金関 and 國分. They had come to Peinan and excavated under the air raid.

I introduced myself briefly in Japanese after the museum staff had introduced her and our visit in Mandarine.

Then one of the elder said to me that he wants to do a little ritual to tell the ancestor about my visit and he started to sprinkle and pour some rice wine on the ground while murmuring completely foreign words yet sounding familiar somehow.

We started talking in Japanese.

I have encountered many old people living here who can speak Japanese well and remember well but I was still impressed how the elders spoke. It was a living language and yet dated to certain era.

I was asking mainly about what they remember around the end of the war. I told them the stories of the archaeologists but they didn’t recall about them. They were 6, 7, 14 years old that time.

One of the elder explain about the Grumman (F6F/Hellcat) air fighters machine-gunning towards the shrine in the hill side, back of today’s Park Site, and the Taitung city center during the War. I asked if the kids in the village had picked up the bullets cases after the air fighters left.

"Oh! yes."

The question seemed to bring back a vivid memory to them and they started talking in their own language.

Then they told me that they gathered bullet cases and selling them to buyers for money. They also said that they melted the lead left in the bullet or bullet cases and dug a shape on the ground to pour the melted lead. It was an accessory for them to carry it around their waist.

I remembered a waist accessory that I saw in the museum in Taipei. Most of the tribes has distinctive fashion style and their clothes and ornaments are highly stylish, so I can easily imagine that this bricolage truly comes out of their tradition and spirit.

Don’t you still have them? I asked.

It’s been a long time. they said.

No one has it? I cannot give up.

Seems like! They laughed.

Yes, it has been 70 some years. I laughed, too.

We chatted for more while and they sang me several songs.
There was this one parody song which kind of making fun of Japanese soldiers a little.



When one of the elder started to sing a song of sending out a young soldier to the battle field, the other 2 joined helping him to sing through. This song has distinctive Puyuma melody pattern and scale with Japanese Lyrics.



兄さんのタバコの煙どこまでも ダンダン(合いの手)
消えない消えない
あのはてまでも 
あー明日の夜 いーよ
待ちましょ待ちましょう ダンダン(合いの手)

My brother, your Tobacco's smoke goes so far
lasting lasting
lasting till the end and afar don-don(rhythmic response)
Ah it is Tomorrow night
I will wait. I will wait. don-don(rhythmic response)

(*trascribed and translated by the author from the recording)

20180911

I bought some betel nuts and tea before visiting the elder again.

The eldest one welcomed me with his smile. He said he enjoyed talking with me in Japanese. I was happy to hear that because I respect him so much after hearing their stories last time and just his 3 names in Puyuma, Japanese, Chinese tells me how much he had to survive through all the turmoils.

I asked him again about the bullet cases in more detail.
How they melted lead. How long it took to do. What kind of shape and how big.
It seemed that one who had more complicated or beautiful shape got reputations. He said he was proud of his own objects and hang around his waist. It sounded more than just a kid’s story. It sounded more than that. He melted the force and poured it on the ground and turned it into his own. There are some examples in contemporary art which transforms fire arms into something else; however, if it is something like shovels that has another practical function, it is different from Puyuma kids who turned fire arms that are the practical thing into accessory that proud not to be practical.

If I look at the history of Puyumas and other aboriginal people, it looks as if they have lost the game being ruled by different foreign forces one after another. But such bricolage and their toughness makes me think that they might have not lost entirely and the most importantly they are surviving.

Just a thought.
………..
IMG_8059
image: one of the elder's drawing from his memory and teaching me some Puyuma words

PN20180924-fn008

20180906

朝9時、プユマ族の長老たちと会う前に檳榔ショップへと向かう。
手土産に何が良いかをスタッフに尋ねたところ、そりゃ檳榔だろう、ということで。
会いに行く目的は、先だって興味をつのらせている卑南遺跡における金関・国分の日本人考古学者による1945年の発掘に関連した何か又は当時の様子を教えて貰うため。

中国語でスタッフが訪問の概要を伝えたあとに、短く日本語で自己紹介した。

御年87歳の最長老が「あなたが来たのをねちょっと報告するから」と言っておもむろにお酒をとりだし地面に降り注ぎながら、本人に聞こえる程度の声で、お清めのようなことだろうか、不思議なしかし何かしら親密な雰囲気の言葉で先祖の霊に語りかけはじめた。

そして私達は日本語で話しはじめた。

もちろん台湾では日本語を流暢に話す高齢の方々と出会うことはあるし時々昔の事を熱心にお話になる方に出会うこともある。しかし何度経験しても生きた旧い日本語の響きは私に特別な感情を引き起こす。

戦争の頃の卑南の様子をあれこれと教えて頂きながら、私が調べている日本人考古学者のことを話した。終戦の時、彼らは6,7,14歳だったそうだ。

一人の長老が、米艦載機のグラマン(通称ヘルキャット)戦闘機の機銃掃射に関して、村はあまり対象にならず丘の方の、現在私が滞在制作中の遺跡公園の裏山、神社だとか街なかがおもに攻撃対象だったとおっしゃっていた。私は自分なりに想像したとおり、機銃掃射のあとに薬莢を拾ったりしませんでしたか?と尋ねてみた。

「あーそうね!」

この質問が引き金となって何かを思い出したのか、長老たちはプユマの言葉で話しだした。

彼らが言うには、子どもたちは確かに薬莢や不発弾を集めては回収業者に売ってお金にしていた。しかしそれ以外にも集めた薬莢などに燃え残っていた鉛を集めて溶かし、さらに地面を掘り「型」を作っておき、溶かした鉛を流し込んで飾りを作って、腰にぶらさげたりした、と。

部族は違うが台北で見た薬莢を使った腰飾りも私の脳裏をよぎる。台湾先住民に共通して言えるのはそれぞれに特徴的な衣服があり、それらは飾りを含めて本当に洗練されていて手が込んでいる事だ。だからこのブリコラージュも真に彼らの精神が生み出したものだと思え、彼らの伝統に直にふれる様な思いがした。

それはもう持ってないですか?と、尋ねた

もうずいぶん前だからね、と返された。

私が諦めきれず、誰かもってないかなぁ・・・と言うと

持って無いだろうなぁ、と彼らは笑った

そうですよね70年ですものね、と私も笑った。

この話が聞けただけで私は本当に台東に来たかいがあったと思う。きっとこういう例は世界各地にあるのだろう、とも想像が広がる。他の部族にもあったかもしれない。

名残惜しさもありしばし長老たちとの歓談を楽しんでいると、軍歌の替え歌などを披露してくれた。楽しげに歌う彼らの歌詞からはユーモアの中に征服者への風刺が込められていた。



そして戦地へと旅立つプユマの若者のために、集まった家族親類が皆で歌ったという歌は心を打った。その歌はプユマの節に日本語載せた歌で、一人の長老が「兵隊を送り出す歌もあります」と歌い出し、途中少し詰まったところから他の二人も助け舟を出すかのように合わせて歌いだした。彼らの声にはハリがあり、節はシンプルなので聞きやすいのだが、なれていないと歌うのは実は難しい。美しく、特徴的ないわゆるアジア的な音階が作る響きには否応なしに郷愁を誘うものがある。



*以下の歌詞は音で聞いたままを書き留めているので本当は違うかもしれない。

兄さんのタバコの煙どこまでも ダンダン(合いの手)
消えない消えない
あのはてまでも 
あー明日の夜 いーよ
待ちましょ待ちましょう ダンダン(合いの手)


20180911

再び檳榔の実をいくらか買って長老を訪ねる。

最長老が私を笑顔で出迎えてくれた。

「あなたが来るとね、日本語で話せるから嬉しいんだ」

と、おっしゃってくださり、私もお話できて嬉しいと伝えた。
これは説明しようがないのだが、言葉が通じるからという以上に本当に嬉しい気持ちがする。先日聞いた話しもそうだが、尊敬の念を私は抱いているからかもしれない。伺ったプユマ語、日本語、中国語の3つの名前を聞くだけで、台湾先住民としての彼の人生がいかに大変であったか想像できる。
私は先日教えてもらった薬莢や鉛で作った飾りの話しをもう少し詳しく聞きたかったので、どのようにして実際溶かしたのか、どのくらいの時間をかけて溶かしたのか、どういう型を作ったのか、など細かく質問させてもらった。

面白かったのは、子供達の間では出来上がりが精巧なほどどうやら注目を集めたようで、長老もうまく出来たものを腰にぶらさげて、他の子供達に見せびらかしたりした、という話し。

「どうだ、っていう顔で歩いて『おい君それ作ったのか?教えてくれよ』なんて言われて」

私にはそれがただの子供の遊び話しではなく、戦争という状況や圧倒的な力の象徴を溶かし、彼ら自身の手で彼らの土地に流しこんで、自分の望む形に変える、という非常に力強く美しいものに思えた。
現代アートにも武器を何かに変える、という作品が見られるがスコップなどの実用性のあるものへの転換などでコンセプトもメッセージは明快だが、プユマの子どもたちの例に見られる武器という実用しかないモノを飾りという非実用性を誇るモノに変えるというような軽妙な行為とはやや異なる。

私が多少見知ったた程度でこんなことを言うのは僭越だと思いながらも考えた事を書いておきたい。プユマ族だけでなく台湾の先住民族全体の状況を知っていくと、ある意味で彼らは度重なる外来勢力によって何度も土地を追われたくさんのものを失ってきたことは明白だ。しかしあのブリコラージュに見て取れる彼らのしなやかさと強さは失われることはなかった。そういった種類の「力」こそが彼ら自身が現在にいたるまでもサバイバルしてこれた力の源だったのではないだろうか。

おぼろげに作品のイメージが掴めたように思う。

付記:これは本当に誤解のないように願いつつ書くと、高砂族とも呼ばれた彼らの一部は首刈り族として16世紀来の入植者オランダ人やスペイン人、日本人に恐れられた。日本統治時代の記録で私の印象に残っているものは、すでに顔なじみになり友好的な態度をとっていたと思われていた者でさえ時として首刈り行為に及ぶとか、生き血をすするとか、日本人警察官(実質は村々の統治者)などが狙われやすいといったような記述だ。ある台湾人から聞いた話だと一部の部族では尊敬を集めた人が亡くなったあとに死肉を食べる習慣もあった、とか。これらの逸話に関しては残酷さだけがクローズアップされる場合が多いが、私は外来品を縫い込んだ衣装や、鹿などの獣の頭部分をそのままヘルメットにしたようなヘッドピースのような装飾品なども、一点において通じているように思う。纏うことや食することをひとつの契機に対象としている相手の力を自らのものにする、あるいはしたいという願望の現れではないかと思う。そう思うと、死肉を食する事は死者を自らに宿す命がけのパフォーマンスだと言える。また、首刈りは、その対象者が外来者であったり力ある者であったり顔なじみであったことを考えれば、自らが認めた「何らかの力の持ち主」を取り込み変身・成長するための戦闘的な儀式である、とも。あのプユマの子どもたちの腰飾りの話しを聞いて以来、私はそんな想像をするようになった。

この記事にコメントする

名前:
URL:
  情報を記憶: 評価: 顔