Here is the correct Wikipedia page for Debito Arudou
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Debito_Arudou&oldid=233572938

Criticism

debitocriticismAnna Isozaki, one of Arudou's former colleagues who was initially active in the BENCI (Business Excluding Non-Japanese Customer Issho) project (unconnected to Arudou's "Community in Japan" project), said that Arudou has an unwillingness to co-operate within a larger organization and that Arudou felt resentment against being told to separate "the apparent center of activity from himself." [29]

Alex Kerr, author of Dogs and Demons: Tales from the Dark Side of Japan (ISBN 0-8090-3943-5), believed that Arudou's tactics are "too combative." Kerr said that he was doubtful "whether in the long run it really helps." According to Kerr, "in Japan… [the combative] approach fails." Kerr said that "gaijin and their gaijin ways are now part of the fabric of Japan's new society," and feared that Arudou's activities may "confirm conservative Japanese in their belief that gaijin are difficult to deal with."[30] On 7 April 2007, Arudou publicly criticized Kerr’s comments on his personal blog and mass e-mail newsletter lists. Following Arudou's public criticisms, Kerr responded in an open e-mail posted by Arudou elaborating on his initial impressions of Arudou’s tactics, his current impressions of Arudou’s newsletter and website, and Kerr’s own distinct techniques for being critical in the field of “traditional culture, tourism, city planning, and the environment” ― “to speak quietly, from ‘within.’” Respecting Arudou's "undoubtedly combative" tactics, Kerr now concluded by stating: “I wholly support [Arudou’s] activities and [his] methods.”[31]

Responding to Arudou's statements regarding the United States Department of State in the Hokkaido International Business Association (HIBA), Alec Wilczynski, Consul General, American Consulate General Sapporo, said that Arudou's statements contain "antics," "omissions," and "absurd statements" as part of an attempt "to revive interest in his flagging ‘human rights’ campaign." On his website Arudou responded with the statement "A surprising response from a diplomat," and posted commentary from an associate regarding the renunciation of Arudou's United States citizenship.[10]

Gregory Clark, Akita International University Vice-President, views the lawsuit as the product of "ultrasensitivity" and "Western moralizing."[32][33] Yuki Allyson Honjo, a book critic at JapanReview.net, criticized Clark's statements and referred to him as one of a group of "apologists." [34] Clark responded to Honjo's criticism, believing that Honjo mis-characterized his statements. Honjo responded by saying that her use of the word "apologist" applied to Clark's particular stance on Arudou's case and not as a sweeping generalization of Clark's character. Honjo maintained her stance regarding Clark's statements. [35]

Arudou has been criticized as "fishing for trouble", and that he "distort[s] the facts". "If there is insufficient media scrutiny, it is of Arudou's outlandish claims."[36]

Robert Neff, author of Japan's Hidden Hot Springs (ISBN 0-8048-1949-1), believes that much of Arudou's campaign is divisive, stating: "I think much of his campaign is faux because most of the places he is going after are in Hokkaido trying to protect themselves from drunken Russians. I have bathed and/or stayed at well over 200 onsen establishments and been stopped only once."[28]

Peter Tasker, author of numerous non-fiction and fiction works on Japan, argues that in "attempting to monster [Japan] into George Wallace's Alabama, [Arudou] trivializes the real-life brutal discrimination that still disfigures our world and the heroic campaigners who have put themselves on the line to fight it."[37] Alexander Kinmont, a former chief equity strategist of NikkoCitygroup, does not believe that a collection of bath-houses, "soaplands," massage parlors, and nightclubs is representative of Japan's civil rights situation in any meaningful sense.[38] Tasker and Kinmont object to Arudou's statements comparing the institutionalized racial discrimination historically exhibited in the segregated American south with the examples that, according to Arudou, show racial discrimination in Japan.[37][38]

WaiWai, "Little Yellow Jap"

In July 2008, following Mainichi Shimbun#WaiWai controversy and cancellation, Arudou stated: "WaiWai was an essential guide to Japanese attitudes"[39]. Arudou approvingly cites and quotes WaiWai over 50 times in his site[40]. Many Japanese people were puzzled and shocked by Arudou's support of WaiWai's exaggerated and mistranslated articles of sexual perversion[41].

In August 2008, Arudou was criticized for his hand-drawn caricature of a buck-toothed Japanese man wearing a loincloth, and for using the World War II era racial slur "Little Yellow Jap" (six times in English, and several times in Japanese) for his cartoon, which he had displayed since 2005 as a "parody" of "Little Black Sambo"[42] [43].


Debito has been banning people who criticized him from his blog.
Now he is trying to supress freedom of speech outside of debito.org.
He wants to make the whole world like North Korea?

Wikipediaにあるこの写真古すぎないか?
Arudou











現在の本人とはかけ離れてる。
Arudou23